GourmetEstorie.com http://www.gourmetestorie.com Savouring Life's Enthralling Moments Sun, 21 May 2017 16:08:39 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.7.5 14531136 The $88++ A4 Kumamoto Wagyu Wednesdays Buffet at Triple Three, Mandarin Orchard! http://www.gourmetestorie.com/the-88-a4-kumamoto-wagyu-wednesdays-buffet-at-triple-three-mandarin-orchard/ http://www.gourmetestorie.com/the-88-a4-kumamoto-wagyu-wednesdays-buffet-at-triple-three-mandarin-orchard/#respond Thu, 18 May 2017 13:12:10 +0000 http://www.gourmetestorie.com/?p=28819 Singapore Food Blog and Review

After my first well-received trip to Triple Three, I had been excited to return again. I finally got the chance to do so this month, and while I found that much had remained the same, one thing had changed. There were now daily themed buffets, including Triple Three’s thematic take on top-grade, A4 Kumamoto Wagyu beef

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Singapore Food Blog and Review

After my first well-received trip to Triple Three, I had been excited to return again. I finally got the chance to do so this month, and while I found that much had remained the same, one thing had changed.

There were now daily themed buffets, including Triple Three’s thematic take on top-grade, A4 Kumamoto Wagyu beef on what it calls Wagyu Wednesdays.

How good is the beef, and is Wagyu Wednesday worth the visit?

Is the Wagyu beef good?

The beef is faultless. This isn’t unexpected, since the Japan Meat Grading Association has graded this Wagyu a four on a five-point scale (five denotes ‘extremely good’, and one refers to an inferior cut of meat). You can expect this premium meat to be buttery, tender, and generously marbled.

But you will have to be strategic about the beef dishes that you go for, since the restaurant serves the Wagyu in seven different ways, and they aren’t crafted equally.

  • The star of the show was undoubtedly the grilled Kumamoto Wagyu beef. Make this your first stop at the buffet’s yakinuku station. These three to four beef slices were heavenly—sliced to a perfect thickness, they were smoky, buttery, and melt-in your mouth. I went back half a dozen times for this remarkable dish.
  • The Kumamoto beef is also done in the following ways, which were decent, but not spectacular:
    • Steamed with herbs, onions and enoki mushrooms
    • Roasted to a medium-rare doneness, with a special house blend of herbs
    • Done nigri-style—slices of beef are served over vinegared rice
    • Done tataki-style—thin beef slices are marinated, lightly seared, and then served with homemade yuzu-ponzu dipping sauce.
    • Stewed
    • Served with rice. The soft-boiled egg served alongside went nicely with the beef in this gyudon, and I would have gone for more than one serving, if not for how I wanted to leave space for the grilled Wagyu.

Is this buffet worth the visit?

This buffet is not the cheapest in town (see prices below), nor is it the most extensive. But you will get what you pay for. The grilled Wagyu alone is worth the cost of dinner. On top of that, there is a strong seafood selection. Enjoy freshly-shucked Pacific oysters, red prawns, Alaskan King Crab legs, mussels, clams, as well as Boston lobsters when they are seasonally available (note: Triple Three has a lobster buffet on Fridays and Saturdays; see below). I also found Triple Three’s pastry selection to be particularly strong.

Consider too, that Triple Three’s location in the middle of Orchard Road means excellent public transport connectivity. Several other good dinner buffets are in hotels that are not easy to get to without a car.

If you are keen to visit Triple Three, but don’t fancy beef that much, the restaurant also has the following themed days:

  • International Mondays: Great for an after-work tipple and meal, with free-flow Kirin draught beer.
  • Foie Gras Tuesdays: Exactly what the name suggests—the buffet features foie gras in a variety of styles.
  • Okinawa Thursdays: Sample champuru (stir-fried) dishes, soki soba, wild tuna, ashi tebishi (Okinawa-style stewed pig trotters), and fresh fruits from Japan’s Okinawa Prefecture. Orion Beer also goes for only $28++ for a bucket of five.
  • Lobster Weekend (Friday & Saturday): The lobster mentaiyaki (lobster baked with roe) is the buffet line’s mainstay during these two days.

Triple Three is probably one of the few buffets (if not the only one) currently to serve great Wagyu beef at a very reasonable price. Wagyu Wednesdays might only run for a limited duration, so make sure you go down soon to savour cuts of this premium beef.

Thank you, Triple Three, for the invitation.
Image Credits: Mandarin Orchard


Triple Three
Mandarin Orchard
Level 5
333 Orchard Road
Singapore 238867
Reservations: 6831 6288/6271
Website: www.meritushotels.com/diningorchard 

Kumamoto Wagyu Wednesdays

Every Wednesday starting 3rd May 2017, until further notice.

Opening Hours

Dinner: 6.30pm to 10pm daily

Pricing

Sunday to Wednesday:

$88++ per adult; $33++ per child (6-12 yrs)

Thursday to Saturday, Eve of Public Holiday and Public Holiday:

$108++ per adult; $48++ per child (6-12 yrs)

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Brunch out from the boring, at The Disgruntled Brasserie! http://www.gourmetestorie.com/brunch-out-from-the-boring-at-the-disgruntled-brasserie/ http://www.gourmetestorie.com/brunch-out-from-the-boring-at-the-disgruntled-brasserie/#respond Fri, 28 Apr 2017 15:23:56 +0000 http://www.gourmetestorie.com/?p=28795 Singapore Food Blog and Review

The thing about brunches is that you want them lazy, and you want them long. You get both of these at The Disgruntled Brasserie, with a five-course brunch set ($48++ per pax) and optional free flow of boozy drinks (additional $38++ per pax) that delivers some incredible bang for your buck. The plates are pretty

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Singapore Food Blog and Review

The thing about brunches is that you want them lazy, and you want them long. You get both of these at The Disgruntled Brasserie, with a five-course brunch set ($48++ per pax) and optional free flow of boozy drinks (additional $38++ per pax) that delivers some incredible bang for your buck. The plates are pretty and the portions generous, making it a great way to lounge around with your friends over the weekend, especially around the fabulous Ann Siang Road area which always seems like a uniquely different part of modern Singapore.

Salt-Baked Beetroot & Smoked Burrata

Three small plate starters are offered to each diner – kicking off the morning is the Salt-Baked Beetroot & Smoked Burrata ($16), a compelling combination of earthiness and smoke, dressed in deep maroon, bright greens and marshmallow whites, like a little Christmas party on your plate. Next is the Gruyere Cheese Soufflé ($16; featured image), an immensely satisfying, savoury starter that made me wish it was a main. It has a heady, fondue flavour with lingering scents of white wine, and the soufflé wobbles just so delicately as you cut into it. It’s easily my favourite dish of the day.

Boston Lobster Bisque

The third small plate to arrive was the Boston Lobster Bisque ($24), a single ravioli accompanied by a deep, intense bisque that you pour over at your own pace. A fun bit of self-theatrics, except when you’re trying to pour bisque deftly with one hand while attempting to film it with your other hand like a drunken skier with a GoPro. That said, it’s a very tasty bowl that imparts the rich crustacean flavour that you would want from a bisque. The portion is a little small, but given that you’re at this point only half way in, you’re quite glad it’s just the size it is.

Carbonara Taglierini

My main was a Carbonara Taglierini ($24), which was carbonara done right – not swimming around in cream; just egg yolk, parmesan, and lots (and I mean lots, three types in fact) of bacon. It’s a heavy dish, so you’d have to be pretty hungry coming in, but between the fresh pasta, runny crusted egg and chunky bits of bacon, you could be excused for inadvertently developing a second stomach.

Pan-Roasted Barramundi

My dining companion had the Pan-Roasted Barramundi ($24), and the first thing you notice is the absolutely humongous piece of asparagus (perfectly grilled and tasty, by the way), but the second thing you do is the great burst of colour and variety of textures on the plate. Then you start on the fish, and you find that it’s firm, flaky and moist – all the things you’d want from a nice piece of barramundi.

Baileys Crème Caramel

Three desserts are offered, from which you get to choose one. On this fine day, I had the joyful pleasure of trying all three (one of the benefits of dining in a group, and also why you should always go for brunch with people who share). The Baileys Crème Caramel ($18) is a curious dish, and possibly the most interesting of the three. Liquid at the bottom, crispy at the top, and cool in the centre, this is the one to get if your palette needs a little tantalizing at the end of your meal.

Apple Tarte Tatin

The Apple Tarte Tatin ($16) is exactly what it says it is. It is also, unfortunately, kind of boring. Don’t get me wrong, it’s a pleasant dessert, and you notice its quality in the vanilla beans speckled throughout the ice cream, but I’d opt for something a little more exciting to round off the meal – it does help overcome the inertia stopping you from getting up after a satisfying brunch.

Homemade Shiso Leaf Ice Cream in Lemon Curd

The Homemade Shiso Leaf Ice Cream in Lemon Curd ($16) is a wonderfully refreshing alternative, colourful and bright on the palette. To be honest, I had to do a bit of Googling to find out what exactly a shiso leaf was (such ignorance, I know), and lo and behold, found out that it’s that ubiquitous leaf they use to plate sashimi. Now all along I’d thought it for display and inedible, but as it turns out, it’s pretty darn tasty. So give this one a shot if you’d rather taste some shiso without having to look like an overhungry person at a sashimi restaurant.

If you’re one of the mathematically inclined and have been adding up the prices so far, you’d notice that the brunch set presents some incredible value. If there’s someone that was disgruntled at this brasserie, I can attest that it sure wasn’t this diner. With its classy, relaxed space set alongside Ann Siang, and tasty bites to lounge away a lazy afternoon with, if the Disgruntled Brasserie’s new weekend brunch isn’t already on your radar, it’s high time it should be.

The 5 course weekend brunch menu is priced at a $48++ per person, with the option of paying an additional $38++ per person to enjoy free-flow prosecco, wines, beers and juices. A la carte prices are also featured.

Thank you The Disgruntled Brasserie for the invitation


The Disgruntled Brasserie
28 Ann Siang Road
Singapore 069708
Reservations: 6808 2184
Website: http://disgruntledchef.com 

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Taste a new spin on Indian cuisine at Flying Monkey Restaurant and Bar! http://www.gourmetestorie.com/taste-a-new-spin-on-indian-cuisine-at-flying-monkey-restaurant-and-bar/ http://www.gourmetestorie.com/taste-a-new-spin-on-indian-cuisine-at-flying-monkey-restaurant-and-bar/#respond Thu, 27 Apr 2017 09:09:08 +0000 http://www.gourmetestorie.com/?p=28775 Singapore Food Blog and Review

Sunlight was waning as I wandered along Bussorah street, having some trouble finding this week’s restaurant visit. As the day turned to evening, Kampong Glam was waking up; people begain filling up the Turkish, Lebanese, and other Middle Eastern restaurants. I myself was looking for the Flying Monkey, a recently opened restaurant and bar serving

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Singapore Food Blog and Review

Sunlight was waning as I wandered along Bussorah street, having some trouble finding this week’s restaurant visit. As the day turned to evening, Kampong Glam was waking up; people begain filling up the Turkish, Lebanese, and other Middle Eastern restaurants. I myself was looking for the Flying Monkey, a recently opened restaurant and bar serving pan-Indian cuisine and spice-inspired cocktails. I finally discovered it under an awning, as there was no evident signage on the façade of the building. Only when coming closer did I see its neon name blazing on the back wall of the restaurant.

Varun, my plus one, arrived soon after. With an extensive history of eating Indian food and imbibing alcoholic beverages, he was there to provide a informed second opinion of the food and drink that we were about to taste.

The eponymous Flying Monkey

We were then introduced to the face of the bar, Kannan “The Beard” Pillai. A bartender with a unique sense of sartorial style and a creative concocter of novel cocktails, Kannan began preparing a selection of four cocktails for us. He started with the eponymous Flying Monkey ($18), a mixture of monkey shoulder, ginger liquor, and bitters of orange and mango syrup, smoked with cherry wood and garnished with a stick of cinnamon and a slice of blood orange. A warming and spicy whisky.

Mind It! A cool, refreshing beverage.

The Flying Monkey was followed by Mind It! ($18). At the bottom of the chilled metal bucket heaped with ice was a sweet and refreshing Monkey 47 gin that had been infused with jasmine for 2 weeks. With maple syrup, mint, and lemon added, the result was a cooling beverage that reminded me of elderflowers.

Served in a small clay pot was the Yo Yo Mani ($18), a gritty mixture of two rums: Plantation 3 Stars White & Overproof Rum, and Koko Kanu Coconut Rum. With extra coconut water and cream, as well as some 5-spice Kerala Rice Syrup added for measure, this gritty concoction tasted of the seaside.

Kannan “The Beard” Pillai torching the Monkey on Fire.

The Beard showing his skill at pulling the flaming drink.

The Monkey on Fire, still on fire!

For the Monkey on Fire ($20), Kannan added grand marnier, maraschino, honey, coconut water, and spices to monkey shoulder whiskey, then torched the drink, setting it on fire. He then proceeded to ‘pull’ the flaming drink ala teh tarik. The azure liquid poured from cup to cup, and finally settled down with the signature cinnamon stick garnish. With some alcohol burnt off, the Monkey on Fire wasn’t as strong as the Flying Monkey, but was additionally warm and smouldering from the heat.

With plenty of alcohol in our bellies, it was time to fill the remaining space with some good Indian food. Nothing is a more classic staple of Indian restaurant cuisine than Tandoori Chicken ($10). After their marination of the chicken overnight with their house spice blend, the chicken turned out very succulent and fragrant. Such succulence, Varun told me, could only have been achieved with yogurt in the marinade.

You would normally expect to find a dish like Calamari 65 ($10) at a British fish ‘n’ chips establishment, but given the informal appropriation of chicken tikka masala as Britain’s national dish, an Indian adaptation of fried calamari could be a welcome and tasty addition to the cuisine. The batter uses flour that is traditionally used to make poppadum, and acquires a curry kick from the curry powder in the batter. Crisp curry leaves as a garnish finish the dish.

Truffle Naan ($14)

We caught a strong whiff of the next dish before we even put it in our mouths: Truffle Naan ($14). The naan is slathered with truffle cream and served with pear chutney and paneer mousse on the side. Varun was not a big fan of the truffle, but I personally thought it was an adventurous offering that I was unaccustomed to finding in Indian restaurants. The side dips were also savoury enough to be eaten on their own. We felt that the naan could have been nicer if it was oilier like most naans, but we find out later from the boss that truffle cream was used intentionally instead of truffle oil to reduce the pungency of the truffle flavouring.

The Tulsi Cod ($15) was immaculately plated and served on a black stone tray, with clearly charred edges from its time in the tandoor. However, the crispy exterior gave way to super soft flesh that had retained its juices. Every bite left a taste of lingering spice.

We were provided fair warning that the Nargisi Kofta ($24) might prove too pungent for some, especially ladies. Nevertheless, Varun and I were game to try it. According to the lore shared with us, this dish was created for a young Indian prince who had to have the mutton minced 13 times to create the smoothest texture possible. The kofta certainly proved to be very fine, like a pate, and the taste of mutton was intense. It can be a bit too strong for those used to lighter flavours, but mutton lovers should give this a go.

Quail Musallam ($26) featured a whole quail and chicken egg placed on top of a bed of flavoured basmati rice and smothered with curry gravy. While most of us are used to eating briyani-style rice with chicken or mutton, the quail proved to be a delicious, if more diminutive substitute.

Our second dish of naan came with the Nalli Gosht ($26), a lamb shank braised overnight, the bone sticking up in the middle of a bowl of garang masala gravy. “This is more like it!” Varun said as he tucked into the garlic naan, which he found sufficiently oily. It seemed to have just left the tandoor, as it was still warm, fluffy, and crispy. It was also good for dipping into the gravy. I also enjoyed the naan with the lamb meat: fall-off-the-bone softness that disintegrated in the mouth upon touch.

Dessert came in the form of Jalebi ($10), a crispy, ultra-sweet, deep-fried snack that is commonly sold on the streets of India. Varun remembered eating a lot of these in his childhood, and finding good jalebi in Singapore, he told me, was elusive. Already, Flying Monkey’s version was promising, as they were made fresh instead of being left in the open like many street stalls, where they quickly become stale. The jalebi on our table shone with oil and edible silver foil. Its sweetness was initially overwhelming, but I grew to enjoy it like a sweet biscuity pretzel, that went well with the accompanying cream. However, both Varun and I felt that it could have been slightly less oily, a sentiment we mentioned to the owner, who was ready to hear our feedback.

The Flying Monkey is a very new establishment, and the second floor is still under development; Kannan shared with us that they were considering making the second floor more lounge-like, maybe even installing a PS4! That would certainly be a very novel concept for an already avant garde restaurant and bar like the Flying Monkey. I look forward to further developments in an already fantastic purveyor of next-generation Indian cuisine.

Thank you Flying Monkey for the invitation


Flying Monkey
67 Bussorah Street
Singapore 199480
Reservation: 6291 0695
Opening Hours: 12-2.30pm; 5.30pm-11pm

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Elsie’s Kitchen Revamps its Food Catering Service with A Mix of the Old and New! http://www.gourmetestorie.com/elsies-kitchen-revamps-its-food-catering-service-with-a-mix-of-the-old-and-new/ http://www.gourmetestorie.com/elsies-kitchen-revamps-its-food-catering-service-with-a-mix-of-the-old-and-new/#respond Wed, 05 Apr 2017 02:14:31 +0000 http://www.gourmetestorie.com/?p=28749 Singapore Food Blog and Review

When I was a boy, one of my favourite weekend activities involved leafing through fliers that came in the mail over the week. My favourite fliers were always those from catering companies—tingkat delivery, babies’ first month birthday celebrations, wedding meal options… I was hooked by the idea of almost bringing an entire restaurant right to

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Singapore Food Blog and Review

When I was a boy, one of my favourite weekend activities involved leafing through fliers that came in the mail over the week. My favourite fliers were always those from catering companies—tingkat delivery, babies’ first month birthday celebrations, wedding meal options… I was hooked by the idea of almost bringing an entire restaurant right to the comfort of one’s home!

By the time I turned twelve, I was fairly well-informed of catering prices, options and conditions. Still, a handful of teens were probably more knowledgeable than I was: The Ang Cousins of Elsie’s Kitchen.

The Ang Cousins come from a storied catering family that has spanned three generations over more than 50 years. Most Singaporeans would have encountered the family, directly or otherwise, through their experiences with catered food—the firm’s major clients are a veritable listing of Singapore’s most well-known brands, MNCs, and government agencies. On its busiest day, the company had even served up 24,000 piping hot packet meals. (that’s almost half the National Stadium’s capacity!)

The Ang Cousins have come of age and now head the family business: 30-year-old Reuben is the managing director, his sister Rachel heads human resources, and cousin Job Ang oversees food and beverage. Yet the trio are not content to let the company coast along—this year, they have re-branded Elsie’s Kitchen and launched a new buffet menu that emphasises innovative variations of Singaporean classics.

That’s how I ended up on a rooftop garden in Clarke Quay one recent weeknight, having been invited to Elsie’s Kitchen menu revamp. The location notwithstanding, it was a down-to-earth affair—think personable wait-staff, a theme of yesteryear Singapore, and good-to-honest cooking.

But Elsie’s Kitchen had kept up with the times, too. At the event, the nostalgic 60s Singapore-themed table setting showcased the firm’s capabilities in conceptualising and executing themed events (from customisable menu cards to table layouts); online, the company’s vibrant social media presence on Facebook and Instagram (#Elsieskitchen) got me clicking around for more than I would care to admit; and the firm’s ongoing (and progressive!) initiative to collaborate with its employees in creating new dishes impressed me because of how it empowered staff.

Elsie’s Kitchen featured eighteen of its menu items that evening:

Canapes

Coconut and Pandan Crème Brûlée

Micro Rojak on Semarang Rose Apple

The savoury rojak provided a refreshing counterpoint to the tart and juicy rose apple. Is one slice enough? Probably not!

Muah Otah Mantou Slider with Achar Relish

 

Buffet

Thai Green Curry Fried Rice

How interesting can fried rice get? Answer: Very interesting, if it’s flavoured with Thai green curry, not bland, and not overly chewy.

Nonya Dry Assam Prawns

Indonesian Sotong Panggang

Signature Muar Mackerel Otah

This otah has been Elsie’s Kitchen’s specialty since the 1990s, when the family’s second generation went on numerous trips to the Malaysian town of Muar to find the perfect otah. It’s a dish that the company is rightly proud of.

Rojak Chicken Katsu topped with Fruit Salad

Twice-cooked Five Spice Lamb with Red Chili

“Kra Pow” Thai Basil Bee Tai Mak with Minced Chicken

I’m usually wary of carbohydrate-laden dishes at buffets because they generally provide a high cost-to-enjoyment ratio (imagine spending all those calories for a pay-out marked by bloat, oil, and a lack of taste). But this Bee Tai Mak is a worthy contender for your stomach space.

Cuttlefish and Kang Kong Tempura with Spicy Dipping Sauce

Live Stations

Signature Nonya Laksa

The Laksa was spectacular. The gravy was of the perfect consistency, the dish was fragrant, and the noodles retained its plumpness even after being steeped in the gravy for a few minutes.

Peranakan Kueh Pie Tee

This was another standout dish that belies the immense effort that goes into making it. The “top hat” batter is notoriously difficult to get right: in the hands of a lesser chef, it can come off too oily, or worse, mushy. Elsie’s Kitchen version was incredibly delicious. The shrimp and vegetables were fresh and juicy, while the “top hat” batter was crisp, light and flavourful.

Desserts

Despite my initial misgivings at the potential for gimmickry, Elsie’s Kitchen successfully incorporated “local” flavours with its cupcakes, cream puffs, panna cotta, tiramisu and tarts.

 

“Teh Halia” Cupcake

Orh Nee Cream Puff, Chendol Panna Cotta, Thai Iced “Tea”-ramisu

Lemongrass Meringue Tart

If you think catered food is static (large trays of colourless food!), boring (“not lime cordial again!”) and otherwise mediocre (salty fried chicken; starchy fried noodles), you’re in good company—I don’t know many people who are enthusiastic about catered food. But if what I tried that evening was indicative of the firm’s wider menu, I know who to call the next time I’m looking to cater food for an event. And Elsie’s Kitchen is good to go for literally any event, from fancy canapé receptions with live stations to mini takeaway buffets.

Here’s to a successful next fifty years, Elsie’s Kitchen.

Thank you, Elsie’s Kitchen, for the invitation.


Elsie’s Kitchen by Hesed&Emet
21 Second Chin Bee Road,
Singapore 618780
Tel: 6288 4457
Email: sales@elsiekitchen.com.sg

Opening Hours

Monday to Friday: 9 am to 6 pm
Saturday: 10 am to 4 pm
Sundays/Public Holidays: Closed
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/elsiekitchen/
Official Hashtag: #Elsieskitchen
Website: http://www.elsiekitchen.com.sg
Payment: Cash / cheque upon delivery

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Chic, Snazzy Vibes at Ginett Restaurant and Wine Bar! http://www.gourmetestorie.com/chic-snazzy-vibes-at-ginett-restaurant-and-wine-bar/ http://www.gourmetestorie.com/chic-snazzy-vibes-at-ginett-restaurant-and-wine-bar/#respond Mon, 27 Mar 2017 23:31:36 +0000 http://www.gourmetestorie.com/?p=28714 Singapore Food Blog and Review

I used to regularly drink on weekday nights when I worked in town, but since I moved out of the civic and commercial district for work, it takes something special to lure me back for a weeknight out. Ginett, however, provides the perfect reason for me to head down to the city centre. On top of

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Singapore Food Blog and Review

I used to regularly drink on weekday nights when I worked in town, but since I moved out of the civic and commercial district for work, it takes something special to lure me back for a weeknight out. Ginett, however, provides the perfect reason for me to head down to the city centre. On top of its unique array of dishes from sharing platters to absolutely fantastic desserts, their wine selection and prices are an absolute steal! Will I be back? Yes!

Yet Ginett is more than a wine bar—it is also an all-day dining venue that serves:

  • Buffet/takeaway breakfasts;
  • Weekend brunches until 4 pm;
  • Decently-priced two-course set lunches ($18++);
  • Cocktails and beers (bottled, draft and craft); and
  • Dinner/bar bites till late (last orders are at 10.30 pm Sundays to Thursdays and an hour later during the weekend)

You won’t miss Ginett when you walk down Middle Road. Sited on the first floor of the recently-renovated Hotel G Singapore (known previously as BIG Hotel Singapore), you will probably gawk at its high ceilings, dimly-lit interior, and the hundreds of wine glasses that adorn its bar.

Ginett’s wine menu is extensive, with at least 70 different wines and champagnes directly imported from France. Pair that with unbelievable prices ($6 onwards for a glass of red, white, rose or champagne; bottles start from $30) and knowledgeable wait staff, and it’s only a matter of time that Ginett becomes the new go-to place for wine-lovers and those looking for a cosy dining spot.

On my recent weeknight visit, I order some wine and a 1-metre long cheese board to start ($54++; serves 3 to 4). Word of advice: Servings are generous, so this board might be more suitable for even bigger groups. Groups of up to four people might want to order the smaller G-board instead ($30 ++; three cheese and cold cuts) and save space for dessert. Your mileage might vary with some of the stronger-smelling cheeses, but there should be enough variety to satisfy everyone.

Ginett’s dinner menu (click here) should already cover most bases, but make sure to ask for the daily specials if you’re keen for a little more variety. My dining companion and I did, and that’s how we ended with a moreish Seafood Salad ($18++). I’m used to restaurants churning out a perfunctory platter of limp leaves to placate the odd healthy eater or two, so Ginett’s hearty portions of shrimps, mussels, clams, cuttlefish and other assorted greens is a pleasant surprise. The salad is a substantial starter that’s able to stand independently of its accompanying vinaigrette.

The Sweet Potato Fries ($8++) and Deep Fried Calamari ($9++) were standard bar bites, and if I had known, I might have ordered something a little less conventional, such as Devilled Egg (prepared with smoked salmon and avocado, $$9++) or Hot Chili Fries ($9++).

One of my biggest bugbears is when a dish is not only mediocre, but comes with a similarly uninspiring price tag. Free Range Organic Rotisserie Chicken ($12/18/24 for ¼, ½, or Whole, respectively) is one such dish. While the half-chicken we got was juicy and firm to the bite, its small size and flat taste meant that other protein options on the menu probably provided better value (consider the Grilled Baked Octopus, $19++; Baked Salmon Back, $18++; or the Tuna Tartare, $21++ instead). To be fair, my dining companion and I enjoyed the smooth and buttery mashed potatoes that accompanied the dish.

The Australian Angus Tenderloin (250g, $39++) was competently done. You have a choice of a side (creamy spinach, mesclun salad, mashed potatoes, ratatouille, mushroom fricassée, or potato wedges) and a sauce (béarnaise, pepper, or blue cheese) to go with your protein, but we were too full to entertain another side and went with three sauces instead. It was a serendipitous decision—the piquant béarnaise sauce went particularly well with the meat.

But Ginett shines unequivocally when it comes to its desserts—we were impressed with all four desserts that we sampled:

Baba au Rhum ($12++) is a yeast cake saturated in rum-infused syrup, and boy, was there a lot of rum in this one! Because of their sweetness and firm texture, the blueberries, grapes and strawberry slices are inspired additions to the alcohol-laden crumbly cake. You might want to moderate your alcohol intake if you’re interested in this rather heavy dessert.

It is not always easy to find a Crème Brûlée ($8) with strong vanilla notes and a crust that is not too cloying. Ginett’s rendition fulfils both criteria and makes a strong case for taking up your daily caloric allowance.

Ginett has been considerate with its Molten Chocolate Cake ($13++). Served mug-cake style, you won’t have to worry about getting just the right proportions of warm, oozing chocolate (70% Valrhona Guanaja) with the requisite scoop of vanilla ice-cream.

The Tarik Tarik Tart ($8++) is a nod by Ginett’s chef to local flavours. The tart crumbles nicely, but the star here is really the smooth and frothy teh tarik cream. With this unique proof-of-concept executed nicely, how about a bandung tart next?

Will I return? It’s an obvious answer, Yes! Ginett has hit upon a winning formula with its attractively-priced drinks, central location, and inviting interiors. The venue’s spacious enough for large groups (think 10-12 people), yet cosy enough for a couple looking to connect over a post-dinner tipple. Just make sure you leave space for desserts!

Thank you, Ginett Restaurant and Wine Bar, for the invitation.


Ginett Restaurant and Wine Bar
Hotel G Singapore
200 Middle Road
Singapore 188980
Tel: 6809 7989

Opening Hours:

7 am till late daily (last orders at 10.30 pm from Sundays to Thursdays and 11.30 pm on Fridays and Saturdays)

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Fun is the Word at Jamie’s Italian Pizza and Prosecco Party! http://www.gourmetestorie.com/fun-is-the-word-at-jamies-italian-pizza-and-prosecco-party/ http://www.gourmetestorie.com/fun-is-the-word-at-jamies-italian-pizza-and-prosecco-party/#respond Mon, 06 Mar 2017 21:36:31 +0000 http://www.gourmetestorie.com/?p=28673 Singapore Food Blog and Review

The mind of a chef differs from the mind of one who merely dines. A diner can appreciate good taste when they encounter it. So can a chef, but intriguing flavours also instigate the gears of a chef’s mind to begin whirring. They wonder: how can I replicate this delicious meal in the kitchen? My

The post Fun is the Word at Jamie’s Italian Pizza and Prosecco Party! appeared first on GourmetEstorie.com.

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Singapore Food Blog and Review

The mind of a chef differs from the mind of one who merely dines. A diner can appreciate good taste when they encounter it. So can a chef, but intriguing flavours also instigate the gears of a chef’s mind to begin whirring. They wonder: how can I replicate this delicious meal in the kitchen? My mother, who has been cooking for my family since I was a baby, is such a person. She has recently become interested in making her own bread, and even tried her hand at making pizzas. So when I received an invitation to join a pizza-making party to learn how to make pizza from the fine chefs at Jamie’s Italian, I knew who my plus one should be.

When we arrived, the bar at Jamie’s Italian presented each of us with a glass of chilled prosecco in our hands as a pre-party drink. A sparkling Italian white wine resembling champagne (which is from France), the prosecco was sweet and fizzy, and it lifted our spirits in preparation for the pizza-making session.

A wide array of pizza toppings: cheeses such as mozzarella and parmigiana reggiano, different cold cuts, herbs, mushrooms, chilies, anchovies, olives, minced meats, tomatoes…

Once everyone was present, we were led to the back of the restaurant where the party would begin. Our equipment and aprons were laid out neatly on a long metal table with a complimentary teal Jamie’s Italian baseball cap on top of each apron, waiting to be donned. At the far end of the table was a lavish selection of leafy vegetables, cheeses, and meats, our choice of toppings for the pizza we were about to make.

The instructor manipulates the pizza dough

The session began with our chef instructor showing us how to manipulate the pizza dough into the right shape. With some kneading and spinning, the sourdough was made round and flat before it was placed in a generously floured pan. The next step was to spread tomato puree evenly and thinly with a spoon, followed by placing our selected toppings in an orderly pattern on top of the dough.

All participants get to pick out their favourite toppings!

My mother spins the dough as the chef marvels at her skill

After the quick tutorial, we began cracking on our pizzas, scurrying to the toppings table to select our ingredients, then trying our best to emulate the chef’s pizza. My mother proved to be fastest at getting the dough to the right shape, impressing the chefs who were guiding us throughout the process.

Spreading the tomato puree across the dough

The party was boisterous, joyful, and gregarious; we compared everyone’s unique approach to their own pizzas and admired those which were made with beauty and grace. One of the other attendees had brought her little kid, who tried his own hand at making a pizza and endeared himself to the other attendees. The chefs and other staff continued to circle the table, helpfully offering advice and guidance.

Everyone is focused on preparing their pizzas

When a person completes the arrangement of toppings on their pizza, the staff would whisk the pizza to the oven in the kitchen. As we waited for our pizzas to bake, the chef showed us how he would plate the pizza. He first cut the pizza into 4 triangular pieces with a pizza slicer, then placed them in a neat row on a wooden serving board. Additional toppings such as parmesan cheese and salad leaves were laid on as garnishing.

Proud of her freshly baked creation.

Our pizzas emerged fresh out of the oven in ten to twenty minutes. If prepared correctly, the sourdough pizza would be crisp on the edges but soft on the inside, the crusts rising appreciably but the main base remaining thin as a biscuit.

We got to eat our own pizzas, of course, and they were as delicious as we imagined they would be, due to the expert guidance and the fresh ingredients provided by Jamie’s Italian. The chefs went around sampling the different pizzas , so that they could come to a verdict as to who had made the best pizza of all. I felt that my mother’s pizza deserved to win, but of course I’m biased, and the chefs thought differently. The prize – one of Jamie Oliver’s own cookbooks! – was awarded to another attendee, whose pizza did look quite marvellous as well.

My mother and I had some great mother-and-son bonding time!

Even though we didn’t win the cookbook, my mother and I gained something else invaluable that day – a new appreciation of how the best ingredients make the best pizzas, and also some mother-and-son bonding time. This pizza-making party was a really good opportunity for a fun social activity, and I could see it being used as a venue for a birthday party for kids or adults, a small company cohesion, or a bachelorette party. It’s not often that this writer gets to make the food he eats, and I have to say that it was really, really fun.

Thank you Jamie’s Italian for the invitation!


Pizza and Prosecco Parties are available on Monday to Thursday for group bookings from 6 to 20 people, at $48++ per person (comes with 2 glasses of prosecco) or $68++ per person (for free flow of prosecco).

Lunch and dinner menus and $10 standard drinks (housepour spirits, wines and prosecco) are available at an additional cost.

This invitation did not include a preview of the Kid’s Version of this party: in addition to designing their own pizzas, the children will also be taken on a restaurant herb garden tour and an introduction to pasta shapes. This session ends with a lunch of one kid’s meal from the kid’s ala carte menu and fruity water. These interactive sessions are available for bookings for a minimum of 8 kids and are priced at $45++ per child.

For bookings, email sales@jamiesitalian.sg.

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