When Skyve-ing Is A Very Good Thing

As MRT stations go, Newton is an oft-overlooked one, even though it’s an interchange station between the North-South and Downtown Lines. Nestled in a fairly quiet neighbourhood without high-density housing estates, it’s usually more associated with its eponymous hawker centre (though, tourists beware).

However, just a few minutes walk away from the station sits the hidden gem that is Skyve Wine Bistro. Helmed by the Le Cordon Bleu-trained Executive Chef Jachin Tan, it’s recently launched a new revamped menu of modern bistro fare to go along with its recent facelift.

Stepping into the compound at 10 Winstedt Road, you get a sense of calm already: it’s tucked away enough to make this a wonderful date spot, or a weekend recharge hideaway. But that’s not enough, of course. If we’re here to eat, then the spotlight must be on the food.

And shine the food does. Chef Jachin’s new menu hits the sweet spot: it’s produce-driven, and I often found it hard to figure out what sort of cuisine this was. But that’s not a bad thing, since he’s not limited by a single culinary tradition, and so the quality of the produce really shines through.

Smoked Tomato: Who cares what cuisine this is, if it’s this good?

One example of this is the Smoked Tomato ($12++). Featuring Momotaro tomatoes from the Cameron Highlands, with buffalo snow, heart of palm and a basil sorbet. The tomato is slow-smoked, and together with the heart of palm, really bursts with flavour that is complemented by the buffalo snow. What then rounds it off nicely is the refreshing sorbet: I’ve never quite been a basil person, but this was a surprising pairing that I really enjoyed!

Mediterranean Octopus: My only regret is that an octopus only has eight tentacles.

Another appetizer that went really well with me was the Mediterranean Octopus ($18++). Pickled eggplant, vandouvan (a French derivative of masala spices) and cauliflower puree accompanied this dish. The octopus was chewy but not tough, and its char-grilled flavour was absolutely delicious. This was one of the best octopus I’ve had in a while, because most places either deliver on the flavour, but produce tough octopus, or a wonderful texture but slightly lacklustre flavour.

Beef Tartare: A French classic with a twist.

But not everything here is all new and fancy: Chef Jachin delivered in the Beef Tartare ($18++) a French classic. But of course, as you probably can figure out by now, he’s not the sort to not mix things up a bit: this came with miso-cured egg yolk, shallot dust and gherkin gelee. Beef tartare is hard to get right, if only because most people aren’t that used to the gamey taste of raw beef. But here, the grass-fed Australian beef takes centre-stage, with just a hint of truffle to get the heady aroma. The miso-cured egg yolk contrasts the flavours wonderfully, a bit of beef, a bit of egg yolk, and you start to believe that perhaps you could live a life of food untouched by fire at all.

Lobster Sang Mee: If it means something to the chef, you can bet it’ll taste very good.

You can’t live off appetisers, of course, even if these are that good. So we move on to the mains: first up is a childhood classic of the chef, a Lobster Sang Mee ($32++). No one really expects a zi char dish to show up in a chic bistro, but I’m not complaining if it’s as good as how he does it. With egg drop soup, mussels, and “abalone” (actually a type of mushroom), the dish is intensely homey, but the lobster and the plating remind you that this is quite a step up beyond what you’ll get at your friendly neighbourhood coffee shop. Clearly, never underestimate a chef when he prepares a dish that is emotionally important to him!

Smoked Tenderloin: A garden, with soil, greens, and an animal I could eat over and over again.

Continuing on the smoked theme, I had the Smoked Tenderloin ($38++). Now, it comes with gobo, braised shiitake and truffle soil, but these are merely the accompaniment to the real star: the excellent meat on offer. It is juicy, and the smoking has clearly managed to lock in the flavours, with a depth of taste that I find difficult to describe in words. Maybe it’s the smoking, maybe it’s the quality of the meat already, but this was quite the tour de force. What added a lot of joy to my dining here was the way the other ingredients came in to play: the braised shiitake offered incredibly earthy tastes that contrasted with the meatiness of the tenderloin, and the truffle soil was just excellent mash. I am very picky about my mash, since potato can be boring if you don’t do it right, but I had zero complaints here.

Semifreddo of Lime: Nothing done halfway here in this semifreddo; wholly goodness.

A meal that begins this well, carries this well through the mains, must also end well. To this end, I enjoyed the two options available: a light and refreshing Semifreddo of Lime ($10++) and the simpler but richer Molten Chocolate ($12++). The semifreddo comes with a lovely aesthetic, using blue pea flower caviar, alongside a distinctively floral treat from the crumbly sable that gave depth to the lime notes of the ice cream. Texture-wise, the dessert developed over the time it took to eat it: first with distinct notes from each flavour, then commingling of flavours as the ice cream melted and each spoonful became a delicious potpourri.

Molten Chocolate: What it says on the tin, in a real celebration of chocolate.

But if you’re not into light finishes, then the option for decadence will also not disappoint. Skyve’s chocolate lava cake is as good as I have had anywhere else, with a candied zest that manages to cut through the richness. This dessert is exactly what it looks like: an elegant chocolate cake that degenerates very quickly into a wonderfully sticky and gooey mess that celebrates chocolate gloriously.

Ah, all that satisfaction. Ultimately, there’s a whole host of options for dining that begin from brunch, till dinner, and I think the setting really just is perfect for the food. Come in for lazy brunches, quiet lunches, and charming dinners. They really do hit the right spot.

Thank you Skyve Wine Bistro for the invitation.
This article was written by Lan Yingjie

Skyve Wine Bistro
No. 10 Winstedt Road

Block E #01-17
Singapore 227977
Reservations: 6225 6690

Website

Saturday Beer Club at Bar MF by Morganfield’s: Really, Why Not?

Saturday afternoons are rather strange bits of the week. On Friday night, you’re relieved the week is over. On Sunday, you’re relaxed, and then you scramble to make the most of the evening before the grind of Monday hits.

But ah, Saturday afternoon, the sweet spot of the wonderful weekend, is when you begin to feel rested. Fresh from a lovely lie-in, but not quite ready for the fun of Saturday night, we often look for somewhere to chill on a Saturday afternoon.

And that is precisely where the Saturday Beer Club at Bar MF by Morganfield’s comes in: free flow craft beers from the tap with beer bites from 4-7pm for $55++ a person, and nestled high above the roar of Orchard Road. What’s not to like?

First off, I’ll tell you what I don’t like about it: that it’s monthly. Aw come on, I could get used to this weekly. And I was a little annoyed when I was limited to having just one beer in hand each time. I’m a man who likes to take sips of two pints and compare (editor’s note: we do not condone the writer’s lifestyle ;)). But beyond that, it’s really quite a wonderful concept. I rocked up to the veranda at Orchard Central with a friend (sip your friend’s beer, that’s how you get around the limitation!), and we had a great time just chilling over the drinks and the food.

Morganfield’s inaugural Saturday Beer Club menu! Selection rotates every month!

Each month, there’s 10 types of craft beer and cider. During the inaugural launch of the Saturday Beer Club, flying the Aussie flag are beers from Beerfarm (Perth, Western Australia), Stone and Wood (New South Wales), and Bridge Road Brewers (Victoria). Beerfarm’s India Pale Lager was something that hit the spot for me, even though I don’t usually consider myself too much of a hophead in the flavours I like. Stone and Wood’s Pacific Ale was a good clean starter too: easy and fresh to open the session with. But what really pleased me was finding a good porter in Bridge Road’s Robust Porter: I definitely picked up a taste for the roasty flavour you get in porters while studying in the UK!

That man just wants to pour you a beer, and he’s not going to demand money for it.

American craft beers aren’t forgotten either: Stone Brewing Co. (Escondido, California) and SweetWater Brewing (Atlanta, Georgia) are on the menu too! As befits the current IPA craze on the American craft beer scene, there’s an IPA from each of them on offer. But what’s intriguing is really the SweetWater Blue: a fruit beer made with blueberries. Still fairly serious a beer, but oooh, the blueberry was a nice touch.

For something a little more unusual, there’s also Black Kite Brewery, a microbrewery in Hong Kong. The Saturday Beer Club features their wheat beer, which is rather banana-ey, with a tart taste reminiscent of sour mash. If it’s free flow, why not experiment with your taste buds, right?

But see, it’s not right to me to just drink beer. The Japanese have a concept that relates to alcohol: otsumami, or bar snacks. They believe that good alcohol must go with good snacks, to pair and bring out flavours complementary to each other.

I had no beef with these beef cubes. They were great.

I believe they are right. And the Saturday Beer Club takes good care of you in that department. There’s Coffee Beef Cubes (aahhhh so good), Grilled Prawns, Burnt-end Skewers with Satay Sauce, Smokey Bacon Bourbon Ribs, Salt and Pepper Squid, Candied Peach BBQ Ribs and Popcorn Pork.

Not your ordinary popcorn pork. Also disappears really quickly when you’re sipping beer, and you don’t realise it at all!

It’s not all meat and more meat: sometimes it’s pancakes and…meat.

Still hungry? Help yourself to Mini Blueberry Pancakes with Bacon, or some Potato Salad or Fruit Salad to ease off from the grease.

Just like that, I had a really relaxing afternoon sipping beers, tasting new things, and generally chilling with friends. Well worth it. See you at the next one.

Thank you Morganfield’s for the invitation.
This post was written by Lan Yingjie

Saturday Beer Club
Bar MF by Morganfields

181 Orchard Road
#11-03 Orchard Central
Singapore 238896

Next edition of the Saturday Beer Club will be held 28 July 2018
Priced at $55++ a person
Tickets available here

Indulge in a Multi-Sensory Culinary Celebration with a Spanish Gourmet Extravaganza at Capella Singapore!

When it comes to dinner, you have three types. The first is what you eat when you are in a rush: picture grabbing a few bites from whatever is in the fridge as you rush out to whatever you have to be at. The second is what you usually eat on a regular day: some people cook at home, others get zichar in, it all varies. And the last type is when you decide: “okay, today’s a special day to splurge”.

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Chef Chen Kentaro debuts his first English cookbook, but hurry, stocks are limited

Michelin-starred chef Chen Kentaro has released his first English cookbook, “A Dash of Szechwan”. To great excitement, I attended the launch at his eponymous restaurant, Shisen Hanten – Singapore’s highest Michelin-rated Chinese restaurant – at the Mandarin Orchard Singapore.

Continue reading “Chef Chen Kentaro debuts his first English cookbook, but hurry, stocks are limited”